Bette Davis

(1908–1989)

Bette Davis

Anecdote...

Jack Warner, the movie producer and co-founder of Warner Brothers, was in the habit of taking an afternoon nap in his office at Warner Brothers, and it was an unwritten rule of the studios that he should not be disturbed. On one occasion, however, Bette Davis burst into the office while Warner was asleep and began ranting about a script that did not meet her approval. Without opening his eyes, Warner reached for the phone and called his secretary. “Come in and wake me up,” he said. “I’m having a nightmare.” Miss Davis could not help laughing, and the crisis over the script was resolved in a few minutes.

Quote-worthy...

Everybody has a heart. Except some people.

~Bette Davis
Biographical Note: 

Bette Davis was a U.S. movie actress. She made her name in dramatic films (“Of Human Bondage,” “Dark Victory,” “Now, Voyager”) in the 1920s and 1930s. During her lifetime, she received eleven Academy Award nominations and appeared in over eighty films. She won the Oscar for best actress twice: in 1935 for “Dangerous” and again in 1938 for “Jezebel.” In 1941, she became the first woman to head the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In later years she specialized in characterizing intense, sinister, or neurotic elderly women, as in “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?” (1962).